Beyond Science and Religion


Dragonfly 44: What Dark Matter is Telling Us

The data shows that modern science is badly in need of a theory to replace what is known as “dark matter.”  This blog proposes a radical alternative to the theories making the rounds in physics.  But the approach presented here may only seem radical to some readers because the existing theory is radically wrong. So I invite comments comparing the theory presented here with the governing theory supported by orthodox science. According to modern science, an invisible form of matter, known as dark matter,  makes up 23% of the total matter in the universe.  Only 4% of the total mass, according to this view of the world, is composed of familiar stuff — rocks, sand, soil, planets, and stars.  (The other 73% is made up another invisible force with the name of “dark energy”). We typically associate the gravitational force with mass; therefore, the larger the force of gravity the...

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The Humor of Michael Shermer

Michael Shermer, the publisher of Skeptic Magazine and columnist for Scientific American, represents the best and worst of modern science.  On the plus side, he writes well, typically picks interesting topics,  and gives me a lot material to write about.  On the negative, he displays the sort of overly-confident, “it is true because I said it is” attitude that is all too prevalent in modern science. One of his favorite topics, which he writes about in the October 2015 issue of Scientific American, is the distinction between science and pseudoscience.  This time he pokes fun at the Electric Universe conference at which he was recently asked to speak.  The Electric Universe community apparently believes that electricity, instead of gravity, is the dominant force in the universe.  And so Shermer, of course, ridicules this group for straying from mainstream science.  He points out that because the Electric Universe community has no peers it...

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Time to Write the Obituary of the Particle-World

            According to modern physics everything is made up of atoms, which is to say particles. Our entire modern worldview, from space exploration to the Large Hadron Collider, and modern medicine, is premised on the notion that particles – electrons, neutrons, quarks, the Higgs boson, DNA, germs, viruses and cancer cells – are the ultimate constituents of the universe.  These particles, we imagine, exist out in the world, free-standing little things, with an existence independent of perception, independent of consciousness, independent of mind.             According to quantum theory, the leading scientific theory of the physical world, particles do not exist, except in our imagination.              Does something seem wrong here?             “Atoms are not things,” says Werner Heisenberg, one of the founders of quantum theory. Niels Bohr, the 1927 Nobel prize-winner in physics and another founder of quantum theory, writes in The Quantum Postulate and the Recent Development of Atomic Theory,...

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Changing Thought-Leaders: My Interview with Greg Moffit on Legalise Freedom

Scientific materialism — the form of science predicated upon the belief that dead matter is the ultimate reality — is slowly fading away.  My current thinking is that we believe in this worldview not because it is right, logical, or even plausible, but because the leading scientists all operate within a system of thought that assumes it is true.  Since science is the most authoritative intellectual discipline, we happily go along with the will of our thought leaders.  After all, who are we to question all of these professors and Nobel-prize winners? But it turns out that scientists do not believe in materialism because it is correct, but rather because of an assumption (or fear?) that the very practice of science cannot occur unless “there is a real world out there” (to use Lee Smolin’s phrase from The Trouble with Physics.)  The very message of quantum physics, however, is that there is not in fact...

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Why Mathematics is Unreasonably Effective at Explaining the Physical World

In his famous article, The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics, physicist Eugene Wigner pondered how it is that mathematics is so effective at explaining the workings of the physical world.  This is the same topic of the recent NOVA special, The Great Math Mystery, which offers a very well-done and interesting account of how mathematics governs the universe from the smallest particles to the sweeping spiral galaxies of the heavens. The effectiveness of mathematics in mapping the workings of the universe, however, should also give pause to anyone who believes that materialism is the final word not only on how the world works, but on science itself. Today, in science, we see highly educated people  pondering the intricate machine-like precision of physical reality yet science has no mechanism to account for how this is possible.  Simply put, since materialists have drained mind, spirit, God, and intelligence from the physical world, they have no...

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